Donald Trump

Trump Tries To Boost Underperforming Campaign By Claiming Credit For Obamacare Provision

Trailing Joe Biden in every single national poll, Donald Trump announced on August 7 that he plans to sign an executive order that would order health insurers to cover preexisting conditions, which Obamacare already does.

“Over the next two weeks I’ll be pursuing a major executive order requiring health insurance companies to cover all preexisting conditions for all customers,” Trump announced, standing in front of patrons of his golf club.

The announcement was immediately promoted on social media by Kayleigh McEnany, the White House press secretary, and Hogan Gidley, spokesperson for Trump’s campaign.

Health insurers were compelled to cover Americans with preexisting conditions after President Barack Obama signed the Affordable Care Act, commonly known as Obamacare, into law in 2010. The legislation was one of the most wide-reaching health reforms passed into law in American history and was supported only by Democrats.

Biden helped to shepherd the legislation through Congress as Obama’s vice president, and famously described the reform as “a big fucking deal” during a press conference with Obama.

Millions of Americans who otherwise wouldn’t now have health insurance thanks to the law.

By contrast, Republicans led by Trump have tried to dismantle the law. Trump promised during his 2016 campaign to continue the crusade to repeal Obamacare, and in the presidency that has been one of the few promises Trump kept.

Even as he tried to adopt the key Obamacare position to boost his campaign, Trump is backing a major court challenge to Obamacare. If Trump’s legal actions are successful, millions would lose coverage.

Trump’s announcement seeks to confuse Americans, banking on millions of people ignoring one of the key accomplishments of the Obama-Biden administration and giving Trump praise for what has already been done.

If you liked this post, please click the link below to support this site and help create more